The Valley & Tableaux Exhibition – 11-23 October 2016

Paintings of the Capertee Valley from the air and small bronze sculptures of psychological associations and anomalies.

“It is with much pleasure that we have the privilege to exhibit these recent paintings and sculptures by Peter Day. Significantly known for his large public installations, these smaller works exemplify the wide range of ideas and understanding of execution that he has applied to his lengthy established professional practice.”

Maureen Cahill AM

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Community Artist and Gallery Artist

Arts Hub Article by Emma Clark Gratton
Peter Day’s large-scale public artworks have influenced his more gallery-friendly pieces.

Most artists tend to focus on one or two media: illustration, watercolours, sculpture. But Peter Day, Artistic Director of Peter Day – Environmental Art and Design, has worked across a wide variety of media over his career, from painting to printmaking, ceramics and mosaics to sculpture.

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Rituals of Cultural Intercourse

Peter’s previous sculptural work explained the opportunities that arose in transforming existing 2D images (ie. Digital prints) into 3D by building objects that used only the shapes that exist in the 2D images. They were constructed from foam core, plastic, mild steel, corten steel, bronze and aluminium. Examples of this work are the Hard Country Series of Sculptures, which are based on the ‘Hard Country’ (Broken Hill) Theme, which was also explored in paintings.

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The Three Amigos – 5 October 2007

Waterholes, Dams, Banks & Shores

New pictures which inhabit the plight of the waterless west -Marianne Newman Gallery 2007

This new crop of work, heralded in the DAY-Survey show at Marianne Newman Gallery October 2006, grew out of the arid outback landscapes of the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. Peter’s preoccupation with waterless and peopleless spaces was conceived in his ‘long country’ driving between community art projects and gestated for many years in the fertile soil of suburbia. The trips to India brought on the birth of these dry (and some not so dry) pictures.

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Day Survey – 2006

Surveying Peter Day

Thirty something works from 30 something exhibitions, over 30 something years.

Surveying Peter Day’s prolific career, one is immediately struck by the distinction he makes between the two aspects of his practice: the public and the private – the work for the client (Day says this is half way between design and art) and the work he creates for himself.

Of the public work, he has completed approximately 170 public commissions in 26 years – making him one of Australia’s most publicly commissioned artists, working from east coast Australia to New York and Mexico in painted murals, ceramics, mosaics, steel, mudbricks, frescos and digital prints.

Of Peter Day’s private works, ‘Day:Survey’ attempts an overview of works created using various media on paper: there are thirty something works from thirty something exhibitions over thirty something years.

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Museings Exhibition – Gallery East – Clovelly Feb 2003

The Landscape of Isolation

These works by Peter Day are landscape based and conceived. Pressing Peter further about the landscape one learns of extended trips through Lightning Ridge, Brewarrina, Broken Hill and the Hay Plains. That vast hinterland of metropolitan Sydney, the outback desert country of New South Wales is the key landscape that he is referring to in this exhibition. What fascinates the painter in Peter about this landscape is its minimalism. There is an apparent absence of topographical variety as the flat plains, which are vegetated with low-level scrub that continues to the horizon and infinity, inculcating a feeling of isolation. Off the ribbon of bitumen road nothing stirs. Only the fences and a dried cowpat suggest the presence of unseen others. In this landscape the vestiges and traces of activity are minimal and the present moment is devoid of any activity outside one’s own movements. The harshness alienates one, the primordial age makes one feel superfluous and the vastness enhances the isolation. On a visit to India Peter found that not surprisingly the landscape of Rajasthan, although very different, evoked the same intense feelings.

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